Monday, 31 July 2006

DVD: Outfoxed

Tag: He who controls the media wins the elections
Review:
This is supposed to be the true story of Rupert Murdoch, the ex-Australian media tycoon who in the name of the dollar became an American and now rules media all over the world. The start is promising, telling us how Rupert started his empire from small time Australia, moved on to the USA, and somewhere along the way got corrupted enough to put all values aside in his bid to expand his empire of control over peoples' minds.
The problem is that quickly enough the film focuses its lens on the American Fox news station, forgetting there is a world out there. In particular, it focuses on how Fox helped Big W become the president in the first place and how he got himself reelected. And the biggest problem is the way in which the documentary tries to prove its point: first it makes a statement, such as "Fox expresses its own opinion as the public opinion"; and then it shows several snippets where this statement applies in order to prove its point.
And that's exactly where I have a problem: Although my own personal opinion on the worthiness of Mr Murdoch and the quality of his newspapers has long been settled (and just in case you're curious: worthless crap that lowers your IQ if you read it for more than two minutes; that is, if you can read it, because most of the time the sentences don't make any sense), I cannot allow myself to be convinced just by the virtue of a few examples. Who knows, maybe in the bits they don't show me Fox turns out to be a knight in shining armor, protecting the poor and fighting the elites to expose the true truth? Before watching the film I expected something like a Michael Moore level of depth; I was greatly disappointed.
Obviously, this film is aimed at the American viewer. Well, what can I do, I am not an American, and I will never be one.
Best scene: Snippets where Fox tries to impose upon John Kerry a French image. Apparently, in modern day USA, French is bad.
Picture quality: Hey, we moved to widescreen. 4:3 is so 20th century.
Sound quality: Expect your surround system to throw a big yawn.
Overall: A disappointing 2 stars.

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